Texas Archive of the Moving Image is loading...

Liquor-by-the-Drink Legislation (1968)

KPRC-TV

Sound | 1968

comment
  • Normal
  • Large video
  • Large content
  • Full video
"rtmpconf":{ type:"flv", file:"mp4:2018_00372_480x360.mp4", baseUrl:wgScriptPath + "/extensions/player/", streamServer:'texas-flash.streamguys1.com:443/vod', width:"480", height:"360", config:{ showBrowserControls:false }, poster:"/library/index.php?action=ajax%26rs=importImage%26rsargs[]=2018 00372 tn.jpg%26rsargs[]=480", controls:{ _timerStyle:"sides" } }
Map
Loading Google Maps...
 
TAMI Tags
  •  State Representative Wayne Connally. Connally served in both chambers of the Texas Legislature from 1967 to 1973. 
  •  State Representative Curtis Graves. Graves served in the Texas House of Representatives from 1967 to 1973. Along with Barbara Jordan and Joe Lockridge, Graves was one of the first African Americans elected to the Texas Legislature since 1896.   
 
Mark Video Segment:
begin
end
play
See someone or something you recognize? TAMI Tagging
Click begin and end to mark the segment you wish
to tag. Then enter your comment and click on Tag!
To: tamitags@texasarchive.org
 
Share this video
X

Send E-mail

Embed

[Hide]Right click this link, select 'open in new tab', and add to bookmarks:
  • About the video
  • Texas Locations
  • Keywords
In this news segment for Houston’s KPRC-TV, State Representatives Wayne Connally and Curtis Graves comment on a liquor-by-the-drink bill under consideration during a special session of the 60th Texas Legislature. The segment aired on June 4, 1968. Connally shares his support, pointing to how such legislation will raise revenue. Graves takes issue with the bill’s mini-bottle provision, and expresses his desire for more direct liquor legislation. In the May 4 election, Texans voted 2,318 to 210 in favor of liquor-by-the-drink legislation, which would allow the sale of mixed alcoholic beverages in restaurants and bars. On June 18, the Texas House approved a law that would legalize the public sale of liquor by the drink in two-ounce bottles. The measure died in the Senate 10 days later by a three-vote margin. The possibility of liquor by the drink legislation was a prominent topic during the 1968 election season. The practice would not be completely legalized until 1971, when the legislature responded to a public referendum by creating a mixed beverage permit authorized on a local-option basis.