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Forest Awareness Week (1993)

Texas Forestry Museum

Sound | 1993

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This educational film highlights Forest Awareness Week, a project that takes students out of the classroom and into the woods. Adolescents learn about forest management, conservation, wildlife, and disease. The program involves multiple organizations, experts, and volunteers and travels across East Texas to various middle and high schools.
Established as a result of the organization of the Texas Forest Association in 1914 and the forestry law passed by the Texas legislature in 1915 the Texas Forest Service is directed by a state forester appointed by the board of directors of Texas A&M College. When it was founded, the objectives of the Texas Forest Service were to persuade and aid private owners of forest land in practicing forestry and converting submarginal agricultural lands to productive forests; to protect private forest lands against forest wildfires, insects, and disease; to inform the public of the contribution that forests, a renewable natural resource, make to the economy of the state; to educate Texans in uses and abuses of forest products; and to assist forest products industries in developing new products and improving production techniques. Currently, the Texas Forest Service's mission focuses on providing statewide leadership to assure the state's trees, forests and related natural resources are protected and sustained for the benefit of all.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department provides outdoor recreational opportunities by managing and protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat and acquiring and managing parklands and historic areas. It has inherited the functions of many state entities created to protect Texas' natural resources. In 1895 the legislature created the Fish and Oyster Commission to regulate fishing. The Game Department was added to the commission in 1907. The State Parks Board was created as a separate entity in 1923. In the 1930s, projects of the federal Civilian Conservation Corps added substantially to the state's parklands. In 1951, the term oyster was dropped from the wildlife agency's name, and in 1963, the State Parks Board and the Game and Fish Commission were merged to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department under the administration of Governor John B. Connally. The legislature placed authority for managing fish and wildlife resources in all Texas counties with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department when it passed the Wildlife Conservation Act in 1983. Previously, commissioners courts had set game and fish laws in many counties, and other counties had veto power over department regulations. Currently, TPWD operates 114 state parks and historical sites, 51 wildlife management areas, and eight fish hatcheries. 

(From the TPWD website.)