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The KHOU-TV Collection - News Clips, February 20 - 25, 1968

Houston Metropolitan Research Center

Sound | 1968

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TAMI Tags
  •  Rodeo, 02/21/68: Crowds watch several events at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo at the Astrodome, including bronc riding and calf roping 
  •  Park Wrap, 02/21/68: In anticipation of an upcoming bond election on February 23, a KHOU reporter talks with Houston City Councilman Frank Mancuso about the funding requirements for city parks. Reporting from an abandoned sand pit at Beverly Hills Recreation Park, Mancuso stresses the need for a safety improvements and recreation facilities.  
  •  Prior to his political career, Houston native Frank Mancuso was a professional baseball player. He played the catcher position for the St. Louis Browns from 1944 to 1946, winning the American League pennant in 1944, and for the Washington Senators in 1947. From 1948 to 1955, Mancuso returned to the minor leagues, playing with several Texas teams including the Beaumont Exporters and the Houston Buffs. He was inducted into the Texas Baseball Hall of Fame in 2003. Mancuso served on the Houston City Council for 30 consecutive years from 1963 to 1993.  
  •  House, 02/21/68: Touring a historic home. Do you recognize this house? Let us know at info@texasarchive.org! 
  •  Mrs. Vick Out of Jail, 02/23/68: Ruby Vick takes press questions as she departs the Harris County Jail. Vick was imprisoned on January 23 on a contempt of court charge for refusing to help law enforcement locate her son, Jerry Ladd Gary. Gary and his daughter, Shelly, had disappeared the previous year after his wife filed for divorce. Vick remained in jail until February 23, when she was released on a $1,000 bond by order of the Texas Supreme Court. The court dismissed Vick’s case on March 28.  
  •  Editorial Layin, 02/23/68: At the intersection of Hillcroft Avenue and N Braeswood Boulevard 
  •  Intersection of Fountain View Drive and Westheimer Road 
  •  Intersection of Dixie Drive and Telephone Road 
  •  Police Wrap - Jud McIllvain [sic], 02/20/68: KHOU reporter Judd McIlvain speaks with Communications Division Supervisor Paul Franklin about the shortcomings of the current police radio system. He then asks Houston Mayor Louie Welch about how the improved system would benefit beat cops and patrolmen. Voters would decide how to pay for the radio system through a February 23 bond election. 
  •  Fire Boat, 02/20/68: Crews load a Houston Fire Department boat onto a trailer for transport 
  •  Hi-Jackers Caught, 02/20/68: While a suspect under arrest, police question witnesses and collect evidence at the B&B Parkway convenience store following an attempted armed robbery. Interrogations continue back at the police station.  
  •  Editorial, 02/20/68: KHOU endorses proposition 11 on the upcoming bond election, which sought $1.5 million for public health facilities  
  •  Martha Raye on Bonds, 02/25/68: Actress Martha Raye shows off a handful of government bonds. Raye toured with the USO during World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. During the 1960s, she made several months-long trips to Vietnam to entertain American troops. For her service, President Bill Clinton awarded Raye the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1993. Upon her death, she was buried at the post cemetery at Fort Bragg and made an honorary colonel in the US Marines and an honorary lieutenant in the US Army.  
  •  Lost Children, 02/21/68: Police attempt to reunite lost children with their parents 
 
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This film from KHOU-TV Channel 11 in Houston contains a series of short news segments that would have aired as highlights to news stories. Many are silent and would have been voiced over by the anchorperson during a live broadcast. The titles for each segment are the originals created by KHOU-TV. The clips on this reel all date from February 20-25, 1968. This series includes news segments about the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, an upcoming bond election, and resolution in a contempt of court case.
The digital preservation of this collection was made possible by a grant to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image and the Houston Public Library from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services.
 
Many more films from the KHOU-TV Collection are available on the Houston Public Library Houston Area Digital Archives website.
Politician Louie Welch was born in Lockney, Texas, on December 9, 1918. He received a degree in history from Abilene Christian College, now Abilene Christian University.
 
Welch began his political career in 1950, serving four terms on the Houston City Council. He unsuccessfully sought the Houston mayoral office three times before being elected to the position in 1963. Houston grew immensely during Welch’s five terms as mayor, from the population topping one million people to the opening of the Astrodome in 1965 and the Houston Intercontinental Airport in 1969. 
 
His tenure, however, was not without its controversy. A 1967 conflict between police and Texas Southern University students created a rift between the local administration and many of Houston’s African Americans. Welch’s reputation also came under fire during his last term over his relationship with well-known crime leaders, leading to suspicions about how his second mayoral bid was financed. 
 
In 1985, Welch ran for mayor again, campaigning in opposition to the extension of job protection rights to homosexuals employed by the city government. He lost to incumbent Kathy Whitmore. 
 
Welch died from lung cancer on January 27, 2008, in his Harris County residence. He was 89.