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The KHOU-TV Collection - News Clips, November and December 1965

Houston Metropolitan Research Center

Sound | 1965

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TAMI Tags
  •  Elephant Silent, 11/10/65: Baylor College of Medicine researchers and students perform an electrocardiogram on an elephant 
  •  Dr. Hebell Hoff, Chairman of the Department of Physiology at Baylor 
  •  Jerry Ward Show 
  •  Make B Wind: Profile on the C-130 Hercules, a four-engine military transport aircraft 
  •  Tomball Parade, 12/04/65: Christmas parade through the streets of Tomball. According to UPI, local merchants volunteered 25 blocks-worth of floats and decorations. Problem was Tomball only spanned 10 blocks at the time.  
  •  Jerry Leaves, 12/06/65: A man adjusts film cameras 
  •  Welch on Firing, 12/06/65: Houston Mayor Louie Welch defends his decision to fire four city officials. On December 3, the mayor asked four department heads to resign.  
  •  Kyle Chapman, 12/06/65: Harris County Commissioner Kyle Chapman presents his proposal to redraw precinct lines so as to more evenly divide the number of persons each commissioner represents 
  •  Yarborough, 12/08/65: US Senator Ralph Yarborough of Texas voices his opposition to the closing of Ellington Air Force Base 
 
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This film from KHOU-TV Channel 11 in Houston contains a series of short news segments that would have aired as highlights to news stories. Many are silent and would have been voiced over by the anchorperson during a live broadcast. The titles for each segment are the originals created by KHOU-TV. The clips on this reel all date from November and December 1965. This series includes news segments about medical students performing an EKG on an elephant, a Christmas parade in Tomball, and a proposal to redraw county districts.
The digital preservation of this collection was made possible by a grant to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image and the Houston Public Library from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services.
 
Many more films from the KHOU-TV Collection are available on the Houston Public Library Houston Area Digital Archives website.
Politician Louie Welch was born in Lockney, Texas, on December 9, 1918. He received a degree in history from Abilene Christian College, now Abilene Christian University.
 
Welch began his political career in 1950, serving four terms on the Houston City Council. He unsuccessfully sought the Houston mayoral office three times before being elected to the position in 1963. Houston grew immensely during Welch’s five terms as mayor, from the population topping one million people to the opening of the Astrodome in 1965 and the Houston Intercontinental Airport in 1969. 
 
His tenure, however, was not without its controversy. A 1967 conflict between police and Texas Southern University students created a rift between the local administration and many of Houston’s African Americans. Welch’s reputation also came under fire during his last term over his relationship with well-known crime leaders, leading to suspicions about how his second mayoral bid was financed. 
 
In 1985, Welch ran for mayor again, campaigning in opposition to the extension of job protection rights to homosexuals employed by the city government. He lost to incumbent Kathy Whitmore. 
 
Welch died from lung cancer on January 27, 2008 in his Harris County residence. He was 89. 
United States Senator Ralph Webster Yarborough, known as "Smilin' Ralph," represented Texas from 1957 through 1971. Yarborough was born in Chandler, Texas, in 1903 as the seventh of nine children, and went on study at the Sam Houston State Teachers College as a young man before attending the University of Texas at Austin, where he graduated from the law school in 1927.
 
In 1931, Yarborough began a short but notable career as an assistant attorney general.  As an expert in Texas land law assigned to represent the interests of the Permanent School Fund, Yarborough won a number of cases against major oil companies such as Magnolia Petroleum and Mid-Kansas, through which he was able to guarantee that public schools and universities receive revenues from Texas oil. This litigation has since brought billions of dollars to public education.
 
In 1938, Yarborough decided to run for attorney general but lost; it would take another 12 years for him to run for any kind of office again. In the interim, he served in the Texas National Guard and the U.S. Army during World War II. In 1952, running against conservative incumbent R. Allan Shivers for the governorship, Yarborough lost his second race. He continued this losing streak against Shivers in the 1954 primary and then again against Senator Marion Price Daniel, Sr. in 1956. In 1957, however, he was able to win Daniel's vacated seat in the Senate next to Lyndon Baines Johnson.
 
In the Senate, Yarborough pursued a progressive agenda, first refusing to sign the Southern Manifesto against desegregation and then being one of only five Southern senators to sign the Civil Rights Act of 1957. For the environment, he pushed through a bill to elevate Padre Island to the status of National Seashore.  For education, he introduced the first Bilingual Education Act in 1967, which was signed into law a year later.  He worked to expand healthcare funding and to extend the G.I. Bill to Cold War veterans. In 1969, Yarborough chaired the Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare.
 
Aside from his legislation, Yarborough is also remembered for riding in the 1963 Dallas motorcade in which President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. The story goes that, being at odds with several of the other politicians on the President's tour, Yarborough originally refused to share a car with Johnson, who was friends with his rivals. This so outraged Kennedy that on the morning of the motorcade he took Yarborough aside and threatened to end their friendship if Yarborough did not cooperate. The Senator conceded and ended up just two cars behind the President when he was fatally shot that afternoon. When interviewed about that day, Yarborough described it as "the most tragic event of my life."
 
In 1970, Yarborough lost his seat in an upset election against Lloyd Bentsen. While he ran once more for office, he did not win again.
 
In 1996, Yarborough died at the age of 92. He is buried in Austin at the Texas State Cemetery.