Texas Archive of the Moving Image is loading...

The KHOU-TV Collection - News Clips, February 22, 1971

Houston Metropolitan Research Center

Sound | 1971

comment
  • Normal
  • Large video
  • Large content
  • Full video
"rtmpconf":{ type:"flv", file:"mp4:2016_04172_480x360.mp4", baseUrl:wgScriptPath + "/extensions/player/", streamServer:'texas-flash.streamguys1.com:443/vod', width:"480", height:"360", config:{ showBrowserControls:false }, poster:"/library/index.php?action=ajax%26rs=importImage%26rsargs[]=2016 04172 tn.jpg%26rsargs[]=480", controls:{ _timerStyle:"sides" } }
Map
Loading Google Maps...
 
TAMI Tags
  •  Welch POW’s: In February 1971, Houston Mayor Louie Welch led a delegation of 17 Houstonians on a mission to Paris, France, to talk with communist diplomats about prisoners of war. (Each member represented one of the 17 Houstonians believed to be held in North Vietnam.) Representatives from Hanoi, the Viet Cong, and the National Liberation Front—in Paris for the ongoing peace talks—all declined Welch’s request for a meeting. The Paris Peace Accords were not signed until January 27, 1973. 
  •  Arrival in Paris 
  •  Louvre Museum 
  •  Welch describes the objective of the diplomatic mission 
  •  Salt Grass: Ranchers stop to rest and eat during the Salt Grass Trail Ride. The kick-off event for the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, the trail ride began in 1952 after four cowmen decided to reenact the journey of pioneer cattlemen taking their herds from the Gulf Coast to Houston. The tradition continues to this day, with travelers riding from Brenham to Houston, roughly 80 miles, in wagons or on horseback each February. 
  •  Vance on Criminal Code: Harris County District Attorney Carol Vance describes revisions to the penal code 
  •  Water Hearing 
  •  Lloyd Bentsen: US Senator Lloyd Bentsen of Texas explains his decision to visit Vietnam and what he plans to do during his trip 
 
Mark Video Segment:
begin
end
play
See someone or something you recognize? TAMI Tagging
Click begin and end to mark the segment you wish
to tag. Then enter your comment and click on Tag!
To: tamitags@texasarchive.org
 
Share this video
X

Send E-mail

Embed

[Hide]Right click this link, select 'open in new tab', and add to bookmarks:
In partnership with:
  • About the video
  • More About Our Partners More About Our Partners
  • Louie Welch Louie Welch
  • Lloyd Bentsen Lloyd Bentsen
  • Texas Locations
  • Keywords
This film from KHOU-TV Channel 11 in Houston contains a series of short news segments that would have aired as highlights to news stories. Many are silent and would have been voiced over by the anchorperson during a live broadcast. The titles for each segment are the originals created by KHOU-TV. The clips on this reel all date from February 22, 1971. This series includes news segments about a local effort to free prisoners of war in Vietnam and a stop on the Salt Grass Trail Ride. Also included is an interview with Senator Lloyd Bentsen of Texas about his decision to visit Vietnam.
The digital preservation of this collection was made possible by a grant to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image and the Houston Public Library from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services.
 
Many more films from the KHOU-TV Collection are available on the Houston Public Library Houston Area Digital Archives website.
Politician Louie Welch was born in Lockney, Texas, on December 9, 1918. He received a degree in history from Abilene Christian College, now Abilene Christian University.
 
Welch began his political career in 1950, serving four terms on the Houston City Council. He unsuccessfully sought the Houston mayoral office three times before being elected to the position in 1963. Houston grew immensely during Welch’s five terms as mayor, from the population topping one million people to the opening of the Astrodome in 1965 and the Houston Intercontinental Airport in 1969. 
 
His tenure, however, was not without its controversy. A 1967 conflict between police and Texas Southern University students created a rift between the local administration and Houston’s African-American community. Welch’s reputation also came under fire during his last term over his relationship with well-known crime leaders, leading to suspicions about how his second mayoral bid was financed. 
 
In 1985, Welch ran for mayor again, campaigning in opposition to the extension of job protection rights to homosexuals employed by the city government. He lost to incumbent Kathy Whitmore. 
 
Welch died from lung cancer on January 27, 2008, in his Harris County residence. He was 89. 
Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. was born in Mission, Texas, in the Rio Grande Valley on February 11, 1921. He attended the University of Texas School of Law, graduating in 1942. After graduation, Bentsen joined the United States Army Air Corps, serving in the 449th Bomb Group during World War II. He received several awards for his military service, including the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters. 
 
After the war, Bentsen returned to Texas to begin his political career, first as a Hidalgo County Judge. In 1948, Bentsen was elected to the United States House of Representatives, representing Texas’s 15th District. He served three successive terms. Bentsen then took a break from politics to seek a business career in Houston, founding the Consolidated American Life Insurance Company and eventually becoming president of Lincoln Consolidated, a financial holding institution. 
 
Bentsen returned to politics in the 1970 race for United States Senate, defeating future President George H. W. Bush in the general election. He was reelected to the Senate in 1976, 1982, and 1988. In 1988, Democratic Party nominee Michael Dukakis selected Bentsen as his running mate in that year’s presidential election. Bush and Dan Quayle from the Republican Party ultimately won the election. 
 
Bentsen resigned from the Senate in 1993 to serve as the Secretary of the Treasury under President Bill Clinton until 1994. (Bentsen had previously served as the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Finance.) The Clinton economic plan for which Bentsen was the primary architect ultimately reduced the federal deficit by $500 billion and led to the lowest inflation and unemployment rates in 30 years. In 1999, President Clinton awarded Bentsen the Presidential Medal of Freedom, one of the highest civilian awards of the United States. Bentsen died on May 23, 2006, at his home in Houston at the age of 85.