Texas Archive of the Moving Image is loading...

Cactus Pryor Interviews Pierre Salinger (1963)

Cactus and Peggy Davis Pryor

Sound | 1963

comment
  • Normal
  • Large video
  • Large content
  • Full video
"rtmpconf":{ type:"flv", file:"mp4:2012_03537_480x360.mp4", baseUrl:wgScriptPath + "/extensions/player/", streamServer:'texas-flash.streamguys1.com:443/vod', width:"480", height:"360", config:{ showBrowserControls:false }, poster:"/library/index.php?action=ajax%26rs=importImage%26rsargs[]=2012 03537 tn.jpg%26rsargs[]=480", controls:{ _timerStyle:"sides" } }
TAMI Tags
  •  Salinger describes the differences between JFK and LBJ 
  •  Salinger on his recent political gaffe and General Trujillo  
 
Map
Loading Google Maps...
 
Mark Video Segment:
begin
end
play
See someone or something you recognize? TAMI Tagging
Click begin and end to mark the segment you wish
to tag. Then enter your comment and click on Tag!
To: tamitags@texasarchive.org
 
Share this video
X

Send E-mail

Embed

[Hide]Right click this link, select 'open in new tab', and add to bookmarks:
In partnership with:
  • About the video
  • Cactus Pryor Cactus Pryor
  • The Driskill Hotel The Driskill Hotel
  • Texas Locations
  • Keywords
This footage captures scenes of Cactus Pryor interviewing White House Press Secretary Pierre Salinger in 1963, during his service to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Cactus talks to Salinger about how he likes Texas, the differences between working for JFK and LBJ, and watching his tongue as he handles the press, as related by Salinger in an anecdote about the assassination of General Rafael Trujillo.
Richard S. "Cactus" Pryor was a comedic television and broadcast personality from Austin, Texas. Cactus, an Austin native, was born in 1923, straight into the entertainment business. His father owned the Cactus Theater on Congress Avenue (hence the nickname), and starting at just 3 years old, Cactus made stage appearances before the shows began. Cactus attended the University of Texas and served in the US Army Air Corp. When he returned to Austin from his service in 1944, Cactus joined the broadcasting team at Lady Bird Johnson's KLBJ radio station, where he worked until 2008. He joined the world of broadcast television at KTBC in 1951 where he was program manager and hosted a variety of television programs, including a football program with Darrell K Royal and many celebrity interviews. Cactus appeared in two films with his friend John Wayne, Hellfighters and The Green Berets. Throughout the 1960s and 70s, he became a sought-after speaker and event host, famous for his roasts of entertainers and politicians, most of whom he counted as close friends. Cactus was also known for his disguises. He would appear at functions in character, often pulling a fast one on the crowd as he charmed them first in disguise, then again as he revealed himself and used his earlier conversations to entertain the crowd. As an active member of the Headliners Club of Austin, Pryor starred in many humorous television news satires alongside Texas politicians, some of which can be seen in his film collection, as well as the Gordon Wilkison Collection and the Wallace and Euna Pryor Collection. He was nationally-known, but kept Austin his home, helping put the city on the map in the 60s and 70s. Cactus Pryor announced to his KLBJ listeners in 2007 that he had Alzheimer's disease, and Austin's "original funnyman" died in 2011.
The Driskill Hotel was opened by cattle baron Jesse Lincoln Driskill in 1886 as a showpiece for the emerging capital city of Austin. A luxurious building with arched entryways and limestone features, the grand hotel was reminiscent of the palaces in New York, Chicago, and St. Louis. It quickly became the place to throw lavish Governor’s balls and host international dignitaries. Jesse Driskill was forced to sell the hotel in 1888 due to a severe drought that cost him his fortune. After years of being traded and sold, the Driskill’s fifth owner, Major George W. Littlefield, vowed the hotel would never close again and initiated a $60,000 renovation in 1895. 
 
President Lyndon Baines Johnson had his first date with his future wife, Lady Bird, in the downstairs dining room of the Driskill in 1934. This marked the beginning of the Johnsons’ lifelong love for the hotel. In the 1950s, the Johnsons rented suites at the Driskill to serve as the offices of their news station, KTBC. It was also the site of Lyndon’s campaign headquarters, where they awaited election results for both the vice-presidential and presidential elections, and the couple frequented their own presidential suite during his presidency.
 
After a planned rennovation falling through, the Driskill Hotel faced demolition in 1969. The Heritage Society of Austin strived to get the building recognized as a historic landmark and succeeded. A series of fundraising campaigns amounting to over $700,000 allowed for the hotel to reopen in 1972, and it has been in operation since that time. Known as one of the most haunted hotels in the country, ghostly spirits have been reported roaming the old hallways, including Jesse Driskill himself!