Texas Archive of the Moving Image is loading...

The 1991 Texas Inauguration of Governor Ann Richards

Cactus and Peggy Davis Pryor

Sound | 1991

comment
  • Normal
  • Large video
  • Large content
  • Full video
"rtmpconf":{ type:"flv", file:"mp4:2012_03479_480x360.mp4", baseUrl:wgScriptPath + "/extensions/player/", streamServer:'texas-flash.streamguys1.com:443/vod', width:"480", height:"360", config:{ showBrowserControls:false }, poster:"/library/index.php?action=ajax%26rs=importImage%26rsargs[]=2012 03479 tn.jpg%26rsargs[]=480", controls:{ _timerStyle:"sides" } }
Teach Texas
  •  Section 1 
  •  Section 2 
  •  Section 3 
  •  Section 4 
  •  Section 5 
 
Map
Loading Google Maps...
 
TAMI Tags
  •  Henry Cisneros and Bob Phillips introduce each other 
  •  San Antonio’s Edgewood School District lines up to lead the march 
  •  The march begins 
  •  (L-R) Cecile Richards, Kirk Adams, Ann Richards, and Dan Richards (L-R) 
  •  Bastrop County Democratic Party 
  •  Ann Richards 
  •  “The People of Texas are Back” banner, Barbara Jordan quote from her endorsement of Richards 
  •  Ann Richards reaches the capitol grounds 
  •  Lubbock Loves Ann 
  •  Texas Southern University Ocean of Soul Dance Band 
  •  Rio Grande Valley marches 
  •  Waco citizens marching, “Home of the Governor” 
  •  Harris County for Ann 
  •  Austin’s McCallum High School 
  •  Austin Mayor Lee Cooke 
  •  The Governor’s Mansion 
  •  ASL translator for the ceremony 
  •  Former Texas First Lady Rita Clements speaks about her husband’s inauguration 
  •  Inaugural Prayer Service at Camp Mabry 
  •  Molly Ivins joins Henry Cisneros and Bob Phillips to host the inauguration ceremony 
  •  Texas Longhorn Band plays the ceremony 
  •  Texas elementary school students offer advice to Governor Richards 
  •  Lt. Governor Bill Hobby tells stories about previous inaugurations 
  •  The hosts spot Texas legislators in the crowd 
  •  Republican State Senator Cyndi Krier of San Antonio speaks about Governor Richards 
  •  Colbert Elementary students (Dayton) give a Texas history lesson rap! 
  •  Marvin Elementary students (Waxahachie) put on a program for Governor Richards 
  •  Former Governor Mark White (right) 
  •  Texas State Representative Ron Wilson of Houston (left, with camera) 
  •  Kids slide down a hill on the capitol grounds on cardboard boxes 
  •  Lt. Governor Bill Hobby tells another story about a previous inauguration 
  •  The Longhorn Band plays “America the Beautiful” as the Armed Forces Color Guard brings the Texas and American flags out 
  •  Texas A&M’s Ross Volunteers Honor Guard makes an arch of their sabers and a 19 Gun Salute echoes as Ann Richards makes her entrance 
  •  Lady Bird Johnson takes her seat on the platform 
  •  Governor Richards’ mother and youngest daughter Ellen take their seat 
  •  Former Press Secretary to Lady Bird Johnson, Liz Carpenter, seated behind Ellen 
  •  (L-R) Cecile’s husband Kirk Adams with daughter Lily on lap, Cecile Richards, Dan Richards, Governor Ann Richards 
  •  Lt. Governor Bob Bullock, wife Gloria Jan Felts Bullock, daughter Lindy Bullock-Ward, grandson, and son Robert D.  Bullock, Jr. 
  •  Acclaimed Texan opera singer Barbara Conrad performs the National Anthem 
  •  Liz Carpenter 
  •  Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives Gib Lewis calls the House to Order 
  •  Invocation given by Rev. Kirbyjon Caldwell of Windsor Village United Methodist Church in Houston 
  •  Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Texas Thomas R. Phillips begins the swearing in of Lt. Governor Bob Bullock 
 
Mark Video Segment:
begin
end
play
See someone or something you recognize? TAMI Tagging
Click begin and end to mark the segment you wish
to tag. Then enter your comment and click on Tag!
To: tamitags@texasarchive.org
 
Share this video
X

Send E-mail

Embed

[Hide]Right click this link, select 'open in new tab', and add to bookmarks:
In partnership with:
  • About the video
  • Ann Richards Ann Richards
  • Molly Ivins Molly Ivins
  • Texas Locations
  • Keywords
This television footage documents the Inauguration Day of Governor Ann Richards on January 15, 1991 in Austin, Texas. Hosted by former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, Texas journalist Bob Phillips, and Texas author and humorist Molly Ivins, the footage captures scenes of the March to Take Back the Capitol led by Ann Richards and her family, as well as the Prayer Ceremony and Swearing In ceremony held for Richards and Lt. Governor Bob Bullock. The excitement of Texas citizens and politicians for the popular governor is easily felt throughout the festivities. Please note that the footage cuts off before Richards in sworn in.
Dorothy Ann Willis Richards was a Texas politician and the Governor of Texas from 1991-95, known for her progressive politics, quick wit, sharp tongue, and helmet of bright white hair. Richards was born in Lakeview, near Waco, in 1933. She attended Waco High School in the late 1940s where she met her future husband, David Richards, and as part of the debate team, attended Girls State, a mock government assembly, where she was elected lieutenant governor, sparking the political involvement that would shape her later career. Richards finished high school in 1950 and attended Baylor University, finishing in 1954. During that time, David transferred to Baylor to be with Ann, and the two married in 1953. The couple moved to Austin after graduation, where David attended law school at the University of Texas, and Ann taught junior high government. The couple then moved to Dallas in 1957 where David began practicing law, arguing civil rights and workers rights cases, representing several labor unions. For a brief period in 1961-62, the family moved to Washington D.C. when David got a job as a staff lawyer with the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. They were quickly disillusioned with D.C. society and "came to the conclusion that when [they] had moved to Washington, [they] had left the New Frontier." The family moved back to Dallas after only one year. In the 12 years the Richardses spent in Dallas, they remained very involved in progressive activist groups and the Democratic party, and they also stayed busy having four children - Cecile (now President of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America), Dan, Clark, and Ellen were all born in those years. 
 
Although they made many close friends there, in 1969, Ann and David decided they could no longer stand living in the stifling conservative environment of Dallas, and David took a job in Austin, continuing his labor and civil rights legal work. Ann became more heavily involved in local politics, eventually managing the legislative campaigns of Sarah Weddington in 1972 and Wilhelmina Delco in 1974. Weddington was the attorney for "Jane Roe" of Roe v. Wade, and Delco was the first African American to represent Austin in the Texas Legislature. Ann continued to work for Weddington during her time in the Texas House, providing Ann the avenue to become known around the Texas Capitol and solidify her political aspirations. After David turned down a request from the Texas Democratic leadership to run for county commissioner in 1976, he encouraged Ann to run instead. She won and became the first woman elected county commissioner in Travis County. She served in that office until 1982, when she was elected state treasurer. Richards was not only the first woman to serve as state treasurer, but she was also the first woman elected to statewide office since Miriam Ferguson was elected governor in 1932. In 1980, Richards was treated for alcoholism, and her marriage to David ended later that year.
 
Richards was reelected state treasurer in 1986, and her political star kept rising. She delivered her famous address at the National Democratic Convention in 1988, rising to national prominence as a result of that speech and her famous line about the elder George Bush, "Poor George, he can't help it. He was born with a silver foot in his mouth." In 1990, Richards ran for governor, winning the Democratic nomination after a somewhat ugly race against Attorney General Jim Mattox and former Governor Mark White. She defeated Republican Clayton Williams on November 6, 1990, and was inaugurated on January 15, 1991, a historic day for Austin as Richards led thousands of citizens to "take back the Texas Capitol" in a march down Congress Avenue.
 
As governor, Ann Richards appointed many women, Latinos, and African Americans to office. She created the state lottery, worked to equally distribute public school funding, vetoed the Concealed Carry Bill, and reformed the Texas prison system. Richards also brought the Texas Film Commission to the Office of the Governor and advocated extensively for the Texas film industry. Richards was defeated for reelection in 1994 by George W. Bush, and her parting words with the Office of the Governor were, "I did not want my tombstone to read, 'She kept a really clean house.' I think I'd like them to remember me by saying, 'She opened government to everyone.'"
 
After leaving office, Richards served as a political consultant. She received numerous awards, including the Texas NAACP Presidential Award for Outstanding Contributions to Civil Rights, the National Wildlife Federation Conservation Achievement Award, and the Mexican government's Order of the Aztec Eagle. She was also honored by the Texas Women's Hall of Fame. She served as a visiting professor of politics at Brandeis University in the late 1990s and authored two books. She spent her years after her divorce from David with author Bud Shrake, an old friend and the second great love of her life. Richards was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in March 2006 and died on September 13, 2006. in Austin. She is buried in the Texas State Cemetery. In 2007, the Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders, a preparatory school for girls, opened in Austin.
Newspaper columnist, author, political commentator, and humorist, Mary Tyler "Molly" Ivins, was born in Monterey, California on August 30, 1944. Raised in Houston, Ivins received a degree in history from Smith College and an M.A. from Columbia University’s School of Journalism in 1967. The same year, she began reporting for the Houston Chronicle and the Minneapolis Tribune until relocating to Austin in 1970 to write for the Texas Observer, during which time she joined the ranks of Austin's liberal elite, befriending, among others, John Henry Faulk, Bob Bullock, and Ann Richards. Ivins became a staff writer for the New York Times in 1976 and stayed through 1980, acting as head of the Times Rocky Mountain Bureau. Her edgy writing style eventually clashed with the Times editors and in 1982, Ivins took a position at the Dallas Times Herald, where her colorful style and liberal perspective were embraced. She became an independent columnist in 2001, and her work appeared in nearly 400 newspapers nationwide. Ivins published several books including her first, 1991’s Molly Ivins Can’t Say That, Can She?. The book’s title was taken from the Dallas Times Heralds humorous response to criticism caused by Ivins’s comments about Republican Texas Congressman James M. Collins: “If his IQ slips any lower, we'll have to water him twice a day." 
 
Throughout her career, Ivins received numerous honors, including her election to the National Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Progress and Service, and the David Nyham Prize for Political Journalism from Harvard University. True to character, Ivins commented that despite her prestigious awards, she was particularly proud of having the Minneapolis police force’s pig named after her and being banned from the Texas A&M University campus. Molly Ivins was diagnosed with late stage breast cancer in 1999, and after fighting the illness for eight years, she died on January 31, 2007. Several months after her death, Ivins’s last book, co-authored with Lou Dubose, Bill of Wrongs! The Executive Branch's Assault on America's Fundamental Rights, was published. 
1990s
1990’s
TFC
Austin
Travis County
footage
coverage
television
TV
Ann Richards
Richards, Ann
Dorothy Ann Willis Richards
Richards, Dorothy Ann Willis
Dorothy Richards
Richards, Dorothy
Dorothy Ann Richards
Richards, Dorothy Ann
Ann Willis Richards
Richards, Ann Willis
Ann W. Richards
Richards
Ann W.
Governor Ann Richards
Governor Richards
governor
government
state government
inauguration
inaugurate
inaugurated
ceremony
celebration
Lieutenant Governor
Lt. Governor
Bob Bullock
Bullock, Bob
Lt. Governor Bob Bullock
Lt. Governor Bullock
Robert Douglas Bullock, Sr.
Bullock, Robert Douglas, Sr.
politics
politician
politicians
Democrat
Democrats
election
elections
ballot
campaign
campaigns
city council
city councilmen
Texas House of Representatives
Texas State Senate
State Senator
State Senators
speaker
speakers
speech
speeches
Representative
Representatives
Senator
Senators
citizen
citizens
voter
voters
vote
voted
Congress Avenue
Congress Ave.
Texas Capitol
capitol
Texas State Capitol Building
Congress Avenue Bridge
Congress Ave. Bridge
parade
flag
flags
American
Texan
police
policemen
officer
officers
Henry Cisneros
Cisneros, Henry
Henry Gabriel Cisneros
Cisneros, Henry Gabriel
Bob Phillips
Phillips, Bob
Robert Leon Phillips
Phillips, Robert Leon
Texas Country Reporter
“Texas Country Reporter”
Governor-Elect
Governor Elect
County Commission
County Commissioner
march
marching
minorities
minority
county
counties
band
bands
student
students
uniform
uniforms
instrument
instruments
Democratic Party
Texas Democratic Party
Texas Democrat
Texas Democrats
State Treasurer
family
son
sons
daughter
daughters
mother
Cecile Richards
Richards, Cecile
Daniel Richards
Richards, Daniel
Dan Richards
Richards, Dan
Kirk Adams
Adams, Kirk
Edgewood Independent School District
education
women
educator
educators
child
children
kid
kids
Governor’s Mansion
Mexico
Mexican
state
states
governors
press
media
Lee Cooke
Cooke, Lee
C. Lee Cooke
Cooke, C. Lee
Mayor Lee Cooke
Mayor Cooke
Camp Mabry
military
base
armed forces
family
families
Texas Longhorn Band
University of Texas
University of Texas at Austin
UT
UT Austin
Bill Hobby
Hobby, Bill
William Pettus "Bill" Hobby, Jr.
William Pettus Hobby, Jr.
Hobby, William Pettus, Jr.
Lietenant Governor Bill Hobby
Lt. Governor Bill Hobby
Lieutenant Governor Hobby
Lt. Governor Hobby
legislature
legislator
legislators
Cyndi Krier
Krier, Cyndi
Cynthia Taylor Krier
Krier, Cynthia Taylor
Cyndi Taylor Krier
Krier, Cyndi Taylor
rap
rapping
Colbert Elementary School
Marvin Elementary School
Mark White
White, Mark
Mark Wells White
White, Mark Wells
Governor Mark White
Governor White
Colorguard
Color Guard
America the Beautiful
“America the Beautiful”
Honor Guard
Ross Volunteers
Ross Volunteer Association
19 Gun Salute
Lady Bird Johnson
Johnson, Lady Bird
Claudia Alta "Lady Bird" Taylor Johnson
Claudia Alta Taylor Johnson
Johnson, Claudia Alta Taylor
Claudia Alta Taylor
Taylor, Claudia Alta
First Lady Johnson
Ellen Richards
Richards, Ellen
Mary Elizabeth "Liz" Sutherland Carpenter
Mary Elizabeth Sutherland Carpenter
Carpenter, Mary Elizabeth Sutherland
Liz Carpenter
Carpenter, Liz
Robert Douglas Bullock, Jr.
Bullock, Robert Douglas, Jr.
Robert D. Bullock, Jr.
Bullock, Robert D., Jr.
Lindy Bullock
Bullock, Lindy
Lindy Bullock-Ward, Bullock-Ward, Lindy
Gloria Jan Felts Bullock
Bullock, Gloria Jan Felts
Barbara Conrad
Conrad, Barbara
Barbara Smith Conrad
Conrad, Barbara Smith
sing
singer
singing
song
National Anthem
Star Spangled Banner
“Star Spangled Banner”
Speaker of the House
Speaker of the House of Representatives
Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives
Speaker of the House Gib Lewis
Speaker Gib Lewis
Gib Lewis
Lewis, Gib
Gibson Donald "Gib" Lewis
Gibson Donald Lewis
Lewis, Gibson Donald
parliamentary procedure
session
congress
congressional
order
quorum
invocation
pray
praying
prayer
Kirbyjon H. Caldwell
Caldwell, Kirbyjon H.
reverend
Reverend Kirbyjon Caldwell
Rev. Kirbyjon Caldwell
Kirbyjon Caldwell
Caldwell, Kirbyjon
Windsor Village United Methodist Church
pastor
Supreme Court
Supreme Court of Texas
justice
Chief Justice
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Texas
Thomas Phillips
Phillips, Thomas
Thomas R. Phillips
Phillips, Thomas R.
Chief Justice Thomas Phillips
Chief Justice Phillips
Chief Justice Tom Phillips
Molly Ivins
Ivins, Molly
Mary Tyler "Molly" Ivins
Mary Tyler Ivins
Ivins, Mary Tyler