Texas Archive of the Moving Image is loading...

Texas in Review - The Alamo (1958)

Texas Historical Commission

Sound | 1958

comment
  • Normal
  • Large video
  • Large content
  • Full video
"rtmpconf":{ type:"flv", file:"mp4:2012_00211_480x360.mp4", baseUrl:wgScriptPath + "/extensions/player/", streamServer:'texas-flash.streamguys1.com:443/vod', width:"480", height:"360", config:{ showBrowserControls:false }, poster:"/library/index.php?action=ajax%26rs=importImage%26rsargs[]=Texas in Review - The Alamo (1958) tn.jpg%26rsargs[]=480", controls:{ _timerStyle:"sides" } }
TAMI Tags
  •  Preparing for the battle 
  •  James Bonham's ride 
  •  Colonel Travis' appeal  
  •  Line in the sand 
  •  Battle  
  •  The chapel today 
 
Map
Loading Google Maps...
 
Mark Video Segment:
begin
end
play
See someone or something you recognize? TAMI Tagging
Click begin and end to mark the segment you wish
to tag. Then enter your comment and click on Tag!
To: tamitags@texasarchive.org
 
Share this video
X

Send E-mail

Embed

[Hide]Right click this link, select 'open in new tab', and add to bookmarks:
In partnership with:
  • About the video
  • Texas in Review ... Texas in Review
  • Texas Locations
  • Keywords
Originally shown as part of the January 24, 1958 episode of "Texas in Review," this clip uses artwork depicting various historical scenes to recount the story of the battle of the Alamo. The film also includes a brief history of the Mission of San Antonio de Valero and gives a tour of the remaining chapel, highlighting building features and relics, such as Jim Bowie's famous knife.

"Texas in Review" was a television series sponsored by the Humble Oil & Refining Company.  Originally produced in a news-like format by Fort Worth's Channel 5, the series was later given to the Jamieson Film Company, who developed its newsreel and TV-magazine style. For five years, Jamieson produced the program in its entirety (writing, filming, editing), until recession-induced budget cuts caused Humble Oil to cancel it in 1958. While on air in Dallas, it enjoyed the prime time spot between the popular "Burns & Allen" and "I Love Lucy."