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Tour of the Bauer House

Wallace and Euna Pryor

No Sound on Film | c. 1970s

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  •  A guide leads a group into the library of the home 
  •  The dining room 
  •  The happy guide 
 
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  • Wally Pryor Wally Pryor
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Located in West Austin, The Bauer House is the official home of the Chancellor of the University of Texas System. This news footage documents a guide leading a group on a tour through the historic building. Built by R. B. Cousins, Jr., the Bauer House was conveyed to the The University of Texas Board of Regents in 1968. The home was named after former Regent William Henry Bauer, who was dedicated to The University of Texas System and the higher education of Texas youth. The original structure was later demolished for a more modern building in the same likeness. For only 50 cents, adults were able to explore the history and decor of the home. This particular group admires a painting situated in the building’s library. They later walk into the dining room where a beautiful collection of fine china is on display. The Bauer House is furnished with prized antiques and art from collections loaned by the Harry Ransom Center and the Blanton Museum of Art.
Known to many as the “Voice of the Longhorns,” Wally Pryor served as the announcer for UT sports from 1953 until 2002. While his voice was certainly recognizable he also played an active role as a producer – for KTBC, amongst others – and regularly served as an emcee for various events. Wally regularly worked as a producer for his older brother Richard “Cactus” Pryor. The films in the  Wallace and Euna Pryor Collection represent a range of films, including home movies, various pieces he produced, and films featuring himself or Cactus Pryor.