Activity (Project-Based Learning Assignment): History in Your Own Backyard

Social Studies, Grades K-12

There are many ways that people learn about their past, their culture, and their traditions. While much of this knowledge can be gained through books, history and culture can also be passed down through experiences and personal records.  One such record that can teach more about the past is the home movie. Home movies enable the engaged observer to learn about ways of life from the not-so-distant past. Styles, cultural practices, and architectural features of an area are all subjects that are sometimes difficult to learn about from books and may not even be documented. In this lesson, students will learn about the concept of local and community history through the medium of home movies and locally-produced footage, including their own films and interviews.

Students will research their hometown, county, or region of the state to examine how it changed over the past 50-100 years using, among other resources, primary source films from the Texas Archive of the Moving Image available at www.texasarchive.org.

Using project-based learning, which improves retention of new content and develops students’ personal connections to the past, students will investigate local events and landmarks to examine how they changed over time in their geographic area of the state. By focusing on the physical, economic, political, and cultural changes in their communities, students will connect the past to the present, making critical observations and assessments about what elements changed or remained the same. Apart from a structured student-driven project, students will also individually research their own personal histories through family interviews, identifying the political, social, and economic reasons their families moved to the area.  Lastly, students will work together to make short films documenting their modern community, highlighting the important changes that have occurred there over the last half century to present to the class.

To submit student videos to TAMI’s collection:  To encourage students to share and save Texas history through film, classes can submit their student videos to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image’s collection. Teachers can contact info@texasarchive.org to discuss submitting class videos to the Archive to represent their region of the state. The videos will be featured in a special online exhibition at www.texasarchive.org. Make your class a part of Texas history!

  • Prior Knowledge Prior Knowledge
  • Hook Hook
  • Lesson Lesson
  • Independent Practice Independent Practice
  • Extended Learning Extended Learning
  • Resources Resources
  • TEKS TEKS
  1. The following lesson assumes students have some knowledge of local and community events, history, and culture.
  2. Students should have an understanding of the concept of “historical thinking,” or an analytical view of the past that takes into account different sources and perspectives. (The core components of historical thinking include understanding multiple accounts and perspectives, analyzing primary documents, and understanding historical context.)
  3. Students should have the skills to conduct research on their subject and create a basic multi-media presentation on their topic using the resources available to them.
  4. Students should have familiarity with recording devices for conducting interviews, Microsoft PowerPoint, basic filming from Smartphone or video cameras, and basic video editing software.

Pick a regional film from the list below. Have students watch it, reflect, and write down what they see, estimating the time period of each film, and observing different types of technology available at the time. Have the students pick a city they live nearest to or have traveled to recently. Have them discuss as a class how the city (primarily its skyline) changed over time.

Films by Region:

Panhandle:

North Central Texas:

East Texas:

Gulf Coast:

South Texas and Rio Grande Valley:

West Texas:

Central Texas:

Hometown History

Examine the history of your hometown, county, or region of the state through primary source films from the Texas Archive of the Moving Image.  Research local newspapers, reliable databases, and primary source films of your geographic area and compare and contrast how it changed economically, physically, politically, and socially. Have students work in pairs or small groups analyzing a number of approved primary and secondary resources. (See Resources tab.) Have students examine the sources and respond in writing to the following questions:

  • In what time period was your hometown founded (date)?
  • What attracted immigrants to originally settle in this area?
  • Over the past 50-100 years, what remains the same in your hometown/region?
  • What industries have existed in this area?
  • How do most people make a living today?
  • What is the principal tourist attraction in this area?
  • What community festivals or celebrations routinely occur here?
  • Describe the physical climate of this region of the state.
  • Describe the political or social climate of this region.
  • Were there any unique facts about your hometown/region revealed through TAMI’s primary source films or other resources?
  • Over the past 50-100 years, what changes do you believe are the most significant for your hometown/region? Explain.

Next, ask students to collaborate and write a one or two page report describing the political, social, physical, and economic changes that occurred in their hometown/region over the last 50-100 years.  Additionally, teachers can give students time to create a short presentation demonstrating their findings for the class, which may include selected primary source videos to showcase in a PowerPoint presentation. Have students refer to the following regional film resources for their hometown/area in Texas.

TAMI’s collection of films by region of Texas

Family History Research

For the independent practice, students will research their family's history, identifying when they moved to the area and what key factors motivated them to move. Student will answer the following questions in their oral history interviews and family history reports:

  • When did your family arrive in this area?
  • What economic reasons motivated them to move when they did?
  • What political or social reason motivated them to move?
  • How many family members live in the area or hometown today?
  • Does your family plan on staying in the area in the future? Why?
  • Do you plan to stay in the area? If not, where do you plan to go?

Have students go back a few generations or more to trace their family’s history in the region. Or, if their families moved recently, have them describe where they lived before and what motivated them to move to this area.

Students will conduct oral history interviews with their parents, siblings, grandparents or extended family members to complete their personal family histories.  Students will need to know how to ask important questions in these interviews and be able to record or document them.  After they have interviewed at least three family members, students will write about their family’s history in the region in a traditional five body paragraph paper to turn in to their teachers that addresses the key questions above.  

Have students work in small groups (3-4 members) to make a short film documenting their modern hometown or region, filming key landmarks and places of significance in the community. Have students select subjects they find socially, economically, or politically significant in the region such as tourism, historic sites, key businesses in the area, key government buildings, schools and parks, or other attractions that best showcase their modern community.

Students’ films should be around 5-10 minutes long. They will present their edited films to the class after they have been given time to effectively research, plan, and document their subjects. Students can make short videos using programs such as Windows MovieMaker, iMovie, or Blender (see Resources tab) and share them by bringing in a thumb drive to class or using web platforms such as Vimeo and YouTube. Students should edit together short clips of different local sites that they can play for the class and discuss in more detail.  Ensure that students select at least four key sites to display and explain their significance to the community. Have students shoot scenes of their hometowns in landscape orientation and, to encourage them to share and save Texas history through film, students can submit their films to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image’s collection.

Teachers can contact info@texasarchive.org to discuss submitting class videos to the Archive to represent their region of the state. The videos will be featured in a special online exhibition at www.texasarchive.org. Make your class a part of Texas history!

Resources

Sources to make videos:

  • Landscape vs. Portrait Orientation Guide
  • Windows Movie Maker (video editing software)
  • iMovie (video editing software)
  • Blender (free, open-source video editing software that can be obtained at no cost from their website. Tutorials on how to use Blender are available through a search on YouTube.)
  • YouTube (video-sharing website for users to upload, share, and view videos)
  • Vimeo (video-sharing website for users to upload, share, and view videos)
  • Powerpoint Office (how to use PowerPoint to make a presentation video)
  • Prezi (animated presentation tool)

TEKS, Social Studies K-12

Social Studies, Kindergarten

2B - Identify contributions of patriots and good citizens who have shaped the community

3A – Place events in chronological order

3B – Use vocabulary related to time and chronology, including before, after, next, first, last, yesterday, today and tomorrow

4A – Use terms, including over, under, near, far, left and right, to describe relative location

5A – Identify the physical characteristics of place such as landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, and weather

5B – Identify how the human characteristics of place such as ways of earning a living, shelter, clothing, food, and activities are based upon geographic location

7A – Identify jobs in the home, school, and community

9A – Identify authority figures in the home, school, and community

12A – Describe and explain the importance of family customs and traditions

12B – Compare family customs and traditions

14A – Obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid oral sources such as conversations, interviews, and music

14B – Obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid visual sources such as pictures, symbols, electronic media, print material, and artifacts

14C – Sequence and categorize information

15A – Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences

15B – Create and interpret visuals, including pictures and maps

 

Social Studies, Grade 1

1A – Describe the origins of customs, holidays, and celebrations of the community, state, and nation such as San Jacinto Day, Independence Day, and Veterans Day

2C – Compare the similarities and differences among the lives and activities of historical figures and other individuals who have influenced the community, state, and nation

3A – Distinguish among past, present, and future

3B – Describe and measure calendar time by days, weeks, months, and years

4A – Locate places using the four cardinal directions

5A – Create and use simple maps such as maps of the home, classroom, school, and community

5B – Locate the community, Texas, and the United States on maps and globes

6A – Identify and describe the physical characteristics of place such as landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, and weather

6B – Identify examples of and uses for natural resources in the community, state, and nation

6C – Identify and describe how the human characteristics of place such as shelter, clothing, food, and activities are based upon geographic location

8A – Identify examples of goods and services in the home, school, and community

10B – Describe how specialized jobs contribute to the production of goods and services

12A – Identify the responsibilities of authority figures in the home, school, and community

12B – Identify and describe the roles of public officials in the community, state, and nation

15A – Describe and explain the importance of various beliefs, customs, language, and traditions of families and communities

16A – Describe how technology changes the ways families live

16C – Describe how technology changes the way people work

17A – Obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid oral sources such as conversations, interviews, and music

17B – Obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid visual sources such as pictures, symbols, electronic media, maps, literature, and artifacts

17C – Sequence and categorize information

18A – Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences

18B – Create and interpret visual and written material

 

Social Studies, Grade 2

1A - Explain the significance of various community, state, and national celebrations such as Veterans Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Thanksgiving

1B - Identify and explain the significance of various community, state, and national landmarks such as monuments and government buildings

2A – Describe the order of events by using designations of time periods such as historical and present times

2B – Apply vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future

2C – Create and interpret timelines for events in the past and present

3A – Identify several sources of information about a given period or event such as reference materials, biographies, newspapers, and electronic sources

3B – Describe various evidence of the same time period using primary sources such as photographs, journals, and interviews

4C – Explain how people and events have influenced local community history

5A – Interpret information on maps and globes using basic map elements such as title, orientation (north, south, east, west), and legend/map keys

6B – Locate places of significance, including the local community, Texas, the state capital, the U.S. capital, major cities in Texas, the coast of Texas, Canada, Mexico, and the United States on maps and globes

6C – Examine information from various sources about places and regions

7A – Describe how weather patterns and seasonal patterns affect activities and settlement patterns

7B – Describe how natural resources and natural hazards affect activities and settlement patterns

7C – Explain how people depend on the physical environment and natural resources to meet basic needs

7D – Identify the characteristics of different communities, including urban, suburban, and rural, and how they affect activities and settlement patterns

8A – Identify ways in which people have modified the physical environment such as building roads, clearing land for urban development and agricultural use, and drilling for oil

9B – Explain the choices people in the U.S. free enterprise system can make about earning, spending, and saving money and where to live and work

10B – Identify ways in which people are both producers and consumers

11B – Identify governmental services in the community such as police and fire protection, libraries, schools, and parks and explain their value to the community

12A – Name current public officials, including mayor, governor, and president

13D – Identify ways to actively practice good citizenship, including involvement in community service

15A – Identify selected stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of the local cultural heritage

15B – Explain the significance of selected stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of the local cultural heritage

16A – Identify the significance of various ethnic and/or cultural celebrations

16B – compare ethnic and/or cultural celebrations

17A – Describe how science and technology change communication, transportation, and recreation

18A – Obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid oral sources such as conversations, interviews, and music

18B – Obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid visual sources such as pictures, maps, electronic sources, literature, reference sources, and artifacts

18C – Use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index, as well as keyword Internet searches to locate information

18D – Sequence and categorize information

18E – Interpret oral, visual, and print material by identifying the main idea, predicting, and comparing and contrasting

19A – Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences

19B – Create written and visual material such as stories, poems, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas

 

Social Studies, Grade 3

1A – Describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities, past and present

2A – Identify reasons people have formed communities, including a need for security, religious freedom, law, and material well-being

2B – Identify ways in which people in the local community and other communities meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation

2C – Compare ways in which various other communities meet their needs

3A – Use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future times

3C – Apply the terms year, decade, and century to describe historical times

4A – Describe and explain variations in the physical environment, including climate, landforms, natural resources, and natural hazards

4B – Identify and compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment in which they live such as deserts, mountains, wetlands, and plains

4D – Describe the effects of human processes such as building new homes, conservation, and pollution in shaping the landscape

4E – Identify and compare the human characteristics of various regions

5A – Use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places on maps and globes such as the Rocky Mountains, the Mississippi River, and Austin, Texas, in relation to the local community

9A – Describe the basic structure of government in the local community, state, and nation

9B – Identify local, state, and national government officials and explain how they are chosen

9C – Identify services commonly provided by local, state, and national governments

9D – Explain how local, state, and national government services are financed

10B – Describe and explain the importance of the concept of "consent of the governed" as it relates to the functions of local, state, and national government

11C – Identify and explain the importance of individual acts of civic responsibility, including obeying laws, serving the community, serving on a jury, and voting

12A – Give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions

12B – Identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community

13A – Explain the significance of various ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in the local community and other communities

13B – Compare ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in the local community with other communities

14A – Identify and compare the heroic deeds of state and national heroes, including Hector P. Garcia and James A. Lovell, and other individuals such as Harriet Tubman, Juliette Gordon Low, Todd Beamer, Ellen Ochoa, John "Danny" Olivas, and other contemporary heroes

14B – Identify and analyze the heroic deeds of individuals, including military and first responders such as the Four Chaplains

16B – Identify the impact of scientific breakthroughs and new technology in computers, pasteurization, and medical vaccines on various communities

17A – Research information, including historical and current events, and geographic data, about the community and world, using a variety of valid print, oral, visual, and Internet resources

17B – Sequence and categorize information

17C – Interpret oral, visual, and print material by identifying the main idea, distinguishing between fact and opinion, identifying cause and effect, and comparing and contrasting

17D – Use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index as well as keyword Internet searches, to locate information

17E – Interpret and create visuals, including graphs, charts, tables, timelines, illustrations, and maps

18A – Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences

18B – Use technology to create written and visual material such as stories, poems, pictures, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas

18C – Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation

 

Social Studies, Grade 4

2C – Explain when, where, and why the Spanish established settlements and Catholic missions in Texas as well as important individuals such as José de Escandón

5A –Identify the impact of various issues and events on life in Texas such as urbanization, increased use of oil and gas, the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl, and World War II

5B – Explain the development and impact of the oil and gas industry upon industrialization and urbanization in Texas, including important places and people such as Spindletop and Pattillo Higgins

5C – Identify the accomplishments of notable individuals such as John Tower, Scott Joplin, Audie Murphy, Cleto Rodríguez, Stanley Marcus, Bessie Coleman, Raul A. Gonzalez Jr., and other local notable individuals

6A – Apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps

7A – Describe a variety of regions in Texas and the United States such as political, population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human activity

7B – Identify, locate, and compare the geographic regions of Texas (Mountains and Basins, Great Plains, North Central Plains, Coastal Plains), including their landforms, climate, and vegetation

8A – Identify and explain clusters and patterns of settlement in Texas at different time periods such as prior to the Texas Revolution, after the building of the railroads, and following World War II

8B – Describe and explain the location and distribution of various towns and cities in Texas, past and present

8C – Explain the geographic factors such as landforms and climate that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in Texas, past and present

9A – Describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present, such as timber clearing, agricultural production, wetlands drainage, energy production, and construction of dams

9B –  Identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present, such as the use of natural resources to meet basic needs, facilitate transportation, and enhance recreational activities

12A – Explain how people in different regions of Texas earn their living, past and present, through a subsistence economy and providing goods and services

12B – Explain how geographic factors such as climate, transportation, and natural resources have influenced the location of economic activities in Texas

12C – Analyze the effects of exploration, immigration, migration, and limited resources on the economic development and growth of Texas

12D – Describe the impact of mass production, specialization, and division of labor on the economic growth of Texas

12E – Explain how developments in transportation and communication have influenced economic activities in Texas

12F – Explain the impact of American ideas about progress and equality of opportunity on the economic development and growth of Texas

16A – Explain the meaning of various patriotic symbols and landmarks of Texas, including the six flags that flew over Texas, the San Jacinto Monument, the Alamo, and various missions

17A – Identify important individuals who have participated voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels such as Adina de Zavala and Clara Driscoll

17D – Identify the importance of historical figures and important individuals who modeled active participation in the democratic process such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, Lorenzo de Zavala, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Henry B. González, James A. Baker III, Wallace Jefferson, and other local individuals

18A – Identify leaders in state, local, and national governments, including the governor, local members of the Texas Legislature, the local mayor, U.S. senators, local U.S. representatives, and Texans who have been president of the United States

19A – Identify the similarities and differences among various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in Texas

19B –  Identify customs, celebrations, and traditions of various cultural, regional, and local groups in Texas such as Cinco de Mayo, Oktoberfest, the Strawberry Festival, and Fiesta San Antonio

 

Social Studies, Grade 5

IA – Explain when, where, and why groups of people explored, colonized, and settled in the United States, including the search for religious freedom and economic gain

4C – Identify reasons people moved west

4D – Identify significant events and concepts associated with U.S. territorial expansion, including the Louisiana Purchase, the expedition of Lewis and Clark, and Manifest Destiny

4F – Explain how industry and the mechanization of agriculture changed the American way of life

5A – Analyze various issues and events of the 20th century such as industrialization, urbanization, increased use of oil and gas, the Great Depression, the world wars, the civil rights movement, and military actions

6A – Apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps

7A – Describe a variety of regions in the United States such as political, population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human activity

7B – Describe a variety of regions in the United States such as landform, climate, and vegetation regions that result from physical characteristics such as the Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, and Coastal Plains

8A – Identify and describe the types of settlement and patterns of land use in the United States

8B – Explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in the United States, past and present

8C – Analyze the reasons for the location of cities in the United States, including capital cities, and explain their distribution, past and present

9A – Describe how and why people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present, such as the use of human resources to meet basic needs

13A – Compare how people in different parts of the United States earn a living, past and present

13B – Identify and explain how geographic factors have influenced the location of economic activities in the United States

13C – Analyze the effects of immigration, migration, and limited resources on the economic development and growth of the United States

13D – Describe the impact of mass production, specialization, and division of labor on the economic growth of the United States

13E – Explain the impact of American ideas about progress and equality of opportunity on the economic development and growth of the United States

22A – Identify the similarities and differences within and among various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the United States

22B – Describe customs and traditions of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the United States

24A – Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States

24B – Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions

24C – Organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps

24E – Identify the historical context of an event

25A – Use social studies terminology correctly

25B – Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication

25C – Express ideas orally based on research and experiences

25D – Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies

25E – Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation

 

Social Studies, Grade 6

1A – Trace characteristics of various contemporary societies in regions that resulted from historical events or factors such as invasion, conquests, colonization, immigration, and trade

2B – Evaluate the social, political, economic, and cultural contributions of individuals and groups from various societies, past and present

3A – Pose and answer geographic questions, including: Where is it located? Why is it there? What is significant about its location? How is its location related to the location of other people, places, and environments?

4C – Explain ways in which human migration influences the character of places and regions

4D – Identify and locate major physical and human geographic features such as landforms, water bodies, and urban centers of various places and regions

5A – Identify and explain the geographic factors responsible for the location of economic activities in places and regions

6C – Analyze the effects of the interaction of physical processes and the environment on humans

7A – Identify and analyze ways people have adapted to the physical environment in various places and regions

7B – Identify and analyze ways people have modified the physical environment such as mining, irrigation, and transportation infrastructure

7C – Describe ways in which technology influences human interactions with the environment such as humans building dams for flood control

8A – Describe ways in which the factors of production (natural resources, labor, capital, and entrepreneurs) influence the economies of various contemporary societies

9A – Compare ways in which various societies organize the production and distribution of goods and services

15A – Define culture and the common traits that unify a culture region

15D – Analyze the experiences and evaluate the contributions of diverse groups to multicultural societies

16B – Compare characteristics of institutions in various contemporary societies

16C – Analyze the efforts and activities institutions use to sustain themselves over time such as the development of an informed citizenry through education and the use of monumental architecture by religious institutions

17B – Identify and describe factors that influence cultural change such as improved communication, transportation, and economic development

18A – Explain the relationships that exist between societies and their architecture, art, music, and literature

18B – Relate ways in which contemporary expressions of culture have been influenced by the past

21A – Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; and artifacts to acquire information about various world cultures

21B – Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions

21C – Organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps

21D – Identify different points of view about an issue or current topic

21E – Identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced participants in an event

21F – Use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs

22A – Use social studies terminology correctly

22B – Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication based on research

22C – Express ideas orally based on research and experiences

22D – Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies based on research

22E – Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation

 

Social Studies, Grade 7, Texas History

1A – Identify the major eras in Texas history, describe their defining characteristics, and explain why historians divide the past into eras, including Natural Texas and its People; Age of Contact; Spanish Colonial; Mexican National; Revolution and Republic; Early Statehood; Texas in the Civil War and Reconstruction; Cotton, Cattle, and Railroads; Age of Oil; Texas in the Great Depression and World War II; Civil Rights and Conservatism; and Contemporary Texas

1B – Apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods

2F – Contrast Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo purposes for and methods of settlement in Texas

6A – Identify significant individuals, events, and issues from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century, including the factors leading to the expansion of the Texas frontier, the effects of westward expansion on American Indians, the buffalo soldiers, and Quanah Parker

6B – Identify significant individuals, events, and issues from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century, including the development of the cattle industry from its Spanish beginnings and the myths and realities of the cowboy way of life

6C – Identify significant individuals, events, and issues from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century, including the effects of the growth of railroads and the contributions of James Hogg

6D – Explain the political, economic, and social impact of the agricultural industry and the development of West Texas resulting from the close of the frontier

7A – Explain the political, economic, and social impact of the oil industry on the industrialization of Texas

7B – Define and trace the impact of "boom-and-bust" cycles of leading Texas industries throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries such as farming, oil and gas production, cotton, ranching, real estate, banking, and computer technology

7C – Describe and compare the impact of the Progressive and other reform movements in Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries such as the Populists, women's suffrage, agrarian groups, labor unions, and the evangelical movement of the late 20th century

7D – Describe and compare the civil rights and equal rights movements of various groups in Texas in the 20th century and identify key leaders in these movements, including James L. Farmer Jr., Hector P. Garcia, Oveta Culp Hobby, Lyndon B. Johnson, the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Jane McCallum, and Lulu Belle Madison White

7E – Analyze the political, economic, and social impact of major events, including World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II, on the history of Texas

7F – Analyze the political, economic, and social impact of major events in the latter half of the 20th and early 21st centuries such as major conflicts, the emergence of a two-party system, political and economic controversies, immigration, and migration

8A – Create and interpret thematic maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases representing various aspects of Texas during the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries

8B – Analyze and interpret geographic distributions and patterns in Texas during the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries

9A – Locate the Mountains and Basins, Great Plains, North Central Plains, and Coastal Plains regions and places of importance in Texas during the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries such as major cities, rivers, natural and historic landmarks, political and cultural regions, and local points of interest

9B – Compare places and regions of Texas in terms of physical and human characteristics

9C – analyze the effects of physical and human factors such as climate, weather, landforms, irrigation, transportation, and communication on major events in Texas

10A – Identify ways in which Texans have adapted to and modified the environment and analyze the positive and negative consequences of the modifications

11A – Analyze why immigrant groups came to Texas and where they settled

11B – Analyze how immigration and migration to Texas in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries have influenced Texas

11D – Describe the structure of the population of Texas using demographic concepts such as growth rate and age distribution

12A – Explain economic factors that led to the urbanization of Texas

12B – Trace the development of major industries that contributed to the urbanization of Texas such as transportation, oil and gas, and manufacturing

12C – Explain the changes in the types of jobs and occupations that have resulted from the urbanization of Texas

13A – Analyze the impact of national and international markets and events on the production of goods and services in Texas such as agriculture, oil and gas, and computer technology

13B – Analyze the impact of economic concepts within the free enterprise system such as supply and demand, profit, government regulation, and world competition on the economy of Texas

13C – Analyze the impact of significant industries in Texas such as oil and gas, aerospace, medical, and computer technologies on local, national, and international markets

15A – Describe the structure and functions of government at municipal, county, and state levels

18A – Identify the leadership qualities of elected and appointed leaders of Texas, past and present, including Texans who have been president of the United States

19A – Explain how the diversity of Texas is reflected in a variety of cultural activities, celebrations, and performances

19B – Describe how people from various racial, ethnic, and religious groups attempt to maintain their cultural heritage while adapting to the larger Texas culture

20A – Compare types and uses of technology, past and present

21A – Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software, databases, media and news services, biographies, interviews, and artifacts to acquire information about Texas

21B – Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions

21C – Organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps

21D – Identify points of view from the historical context surrounding an event and the frame of reference that influenced the participants

21E – Support a point of view on a social studies issue or event

22A – Use social studies terminology correctly

22B – Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, punctuation, and proper citation of sources

22C – Transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate

22D – Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information

 

Social Studies, Grade 8, U.S. History

1B – Apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods

6B – Explain the political, economic, and social roots of Manifest Destiny

6C – Analyze the relationship between the concept of Manifest Destiny and the westward growth of the nation

10A – Locate places and regions of importance in the United States during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries

10B – Compare places and regions of the United States in terms of physical and human characteristics

10C – Analyze the effects of physical and human geographic factors on major historical and contemporary events in the United States

11A – Analyze how physical characteristics of the environment influenced population distribution, settlement patterns, and economic activities in the United States during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries

11B – Describe the positive and negative consequences of human modification of the physical environment of the United States

11C – Describe how different immigrant groups interacted with the environment in the United States during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries

12A – Identify economic differences among different regions of the United States

12C – Explain the reasons for the increase in factories and urbanization

12D – Analyze the causes and effects of economic differences among different regions of the United States at selected times in U.S. history

23A – Identify selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups that settled in the United States and explain their reasons for immigration

23B – Explain the relationship between urbanization and conflicts resulting from differences in religion, social class, and political beliefs

23C – Identify ways conflicts between people from various racial, ethnic, and religious groups were resolved

23D – Analyze the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to our national identity

23E – Identify the political, social, and economic contributions of women to American society

26B – Identify examples of American art, music, and literature that reflect society in different eras

27B – Analyze the impact of transportation and communication systems on the growth, development, and urbanization of the United States

28B – Identify examples of how industrialization changed life in the United States

29A – Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software, databases, media and news services, biographies, interviews, and artifacts to acquire information about the United States

29B – Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions

29C – Organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps

29D – Identify points of view from the historical context surrounding an event and the frame of reference which influenced the participants

29E – Support a point of view on a social studies issue or event

30A – Use social studies terminology correctly

30B – Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, punctuation, and proper citation of sources

30C – Transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate

30D – Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information

 

Social Studies, Grade 9, World Geography

1A – Analyze the effects of physical and human geographic patterns and processes on the past and describe their impact on the present, including significant physical features and environmental conditions that influenced migration patterns and shaped the distribution of culture groups today

2A – Describe the human and physical characteristics of the same regions at different periods of time to evaluate relationships between past events and current conditions

2B – Explain how changes in societies have led to diverse uses of physical features

3B – Describe the physical processes that affect the environments of regions, including weather, tectonic forces, erosion, and soil-building processes

5A – Analyze how the character of a place is related to its political, economic, social, and cultural elements

6A – Locate and describe human and physical features that influence the size and distribution of settlements

6B – Explain the processes that have caused changes in settlement patterns, including urbanization, transportation, access to and availability of resources, and economic activities

8A – Compare ways that humans depend on, adapt to, and modify the physical environment, including the influences of culture and technology

8B – Describe the interaction between humans and the physical environment and analyze the consequences of extreme weather and other natural disasters such as El Niño, floods, tsunamis, and volcanoes

9A – Identify physical and/or human factors such as climate, vegetation, language, trade networks, political units, river systems, and religion that constitute a region

11B – Identify the factors affecting the location of different types of economic activities, including subsistence and commercial agriculture, manufacturing, and service industries

11C – Assess how changes in climate, resources, and infrastructure (technology, transportation, and communication) affect the location and patterns of economic activities

12A – Analyze how the creation, distribution, and management of key natural resources affects the location and patterns of movement of products, money, and people

12B – Evaluate the geographic and economic impact of policies related to the development, use, and scarcity of natural resources such as regulations of water

13A – Interpret maps to explain the division of land, including man-made and natural borders, into separate political units such as cities, states, or countries

15A – Identify and give examples of different points of view that influence the development of public policies and decision-making processes on local, state, national, and international levels

16A – Describe distinctive cultural patterns and landscapes associated with different places in Texas, the United States, and other regions of the world and how these patterns influenced the processes of innovation and diffusion

16B – Describe elements of culture, including language, religion, beliefs and customs, institutions, and technologies

16C – Explain ways various groups of people perceive the characteristics of their own and other cultures, places, and regions differently

16D – Compare life in a variety of urban and rural areas in the world to evaluate political, economic, social, and environmental changes

17D – Evaluate the experiences and contributions of diverse groups to multicultural societies

19C – Examine the environmental, economic, and social impacts of advances in technology on agriculture and natural resources

22B – Generate summaries, generalizations, and thesis statements supported by evidence

22C – Use geographic terminology correctly

22D – Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation

22E – Create original work using proper citations and understanding and avoiding plagiarism

23A – Plan, organize, and complete a research project that involves asking geographic questions; acquiring, organizing, and analyzing information; answering questions; and communicating results

 

Social Studies, Grade 10, World History

15A – Create and interpret thematic maps, graphs, and charts to demonstrate the relationship between geography and the historical development of a region or nation

16C – Interpret maps, charts, and graphs to explain how geography has influenced people and events in the past

17C – Summarize the economic and social impact of 20th century globalization

26A – Identify significant examples of art and architecture that demonstrate an artistic ideal or visual principle from selected cultures

29A – Identify methods used by archaeologists, anthropologists, historians, and geographers to analyze evidence

29B – Explain how historians, when examining sources, analyze frame of reference, historical context, and point of view to interpret historical events

29C – Explain the differences between primary and secondary sources and examine those sources to analyze frame of reference, historical context, and point of view

29D – Evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author

29E – Identify bias in written, oral, and visual material

29F – Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, drawing inferences and conclusions, and developing connections between historical events over time

29G – Construct a thesis on a social studies issue or event supported by evidence

30A – Use social studies terminology correctly

30B – Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation

30C – Interpret and create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information

30D – Transfer information from one medium to another

 

Social Studies, Grade 11, United States History Since 1877

2A – Identify the major characteristics that define an historical era

2C – Apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods

2D – Explain the significance of the following years as turning points: 1898 (Spanish-American War), 1914-1918 (World War I), 1929 (the Great Depression begins), 1939-1945 (World War II), 1957 (Sputnik launch ignites U.S.-Soviet space race), 1968-1969 (Martin Luther King Jr. assassination and U.S. lands on the moon), 1991 (Cold War ends), 2001 (terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon), and 2008 (election of first black president, Barack Obama)

3B – Analyze economic issues such as industrialization, the growth of railroads, the growth of labor unions, farm issues, the cattle industry boom, the rise of entrepreneurship, free enterprise, and the pros and cons of big business

27A – Explain the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as electric power, telephone and satellite communications, petroleum-based products, steel production, and computers on the economic development of the United States

28A –  Analyze how scientific discoveries, technological innovations, and the application of these by the free enterprise system, including those in transportation and communication, improve the standard of living in the United States

29A – Use a variety of both primary and secondary valid sources to acquire information and to analyze and answer historical questions

29B – Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions

29C – Understand how historians interpret the past (historiography) and how their interpretations of history may change over time

29D – Use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple types of sources of evidence

29E – Evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author, including points of view, frames of reference, and historical context

29F – Identify bias in written, oral, and visual material

29G – Identify and support with historical evidence a point of view on a social studies issue or event

29H – Use appropriate skills to analyze and interpret social studies information such as maps, graphs, presentations, speeches, lectures, and political cartoons

30A – Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information

30B – Use correct social studies terminology to explain historical concepts

30C – Use different forms of media to convey information, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using available computer software as appropriate

 

Social Studies, Grade 12, U.S. Government

4A – Identify the significance to the United States of the location and key natural resources of selected global places or regions

5A – Explain how government fiscal, monetary, and regulatory policies influence the economy at the local, state, and national levels

11A – Analyze the functions of political parties and their role in the electoral process at local, state, and national levels

20A – Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions

21A – Use social studies terminology correctly

21B – Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation

21C – Transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate

21D – Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information