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Manned Spacecraft Center Progress Report, January-June 1967

Hardin-Simmons University Library

Sound | 1967

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TAMI Tags
  •  Changes made to the Apollo spacecraft in response to the A204 Accident Review Board 
  •  Simulators for the Command and Lunar Modules 
  •  Specialized simulators, such as the dynamic crew procedures simulator and the target and docking simulator 
  •  Training for extravehicular activity at the Water Immersion Facility 
  •  The Real Time Computer Complex, located at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston 
  •  The Lunar Receiving Laboratory opens 
  •  Quarantine procedures for crew and lunar samples 
  •  Underground radiation laboratory 
 
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In January 1967, astronauts Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Edward White, and Roger Chaffee died in a cabin fire during a launch rehearsal for AS-204 (later named Apollo 1). Produced by the Houston-based A-V Corporation for NASA’s Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), this government film details some of the findings of the 204 Accident Review Board and the corrective steps taken to ensure the safety of the Apollo spacecraft, most of which are described by the astronauts who will be flying aboard Apollo 7. The progress report next surveys the various Apollo simulators—many of which were located at the MSC in Houston—used to train the Apollo 7 crew. Simulators featured here include those for the Command and Lunar Modules, as well as the launch simulator, target and docking simulator, water immersion facility, partial gravity simulator, and mission procedures simulator. We also get a look at the state-of-the-art computer technology used to run the simulators and the communications, command, and telemetry systems. We round out this progress report with a tour of the MSC's newly completed Lunar Receiving Laboratory, including an explanation of the quarantining procedures for returning astronauts and lunar samples.
As the scope of the American space program grew, NASA’s Space Task Group realized it would need to expand into its own facility if it were to successfully land a man on the Moon. In 1961, the agency’s selection team chose a 1,000-acre cow pasture in Houston, Texas, as the proposed center’s location site, owing to its access to water transport and commercial jet service, moderate climate, and proximity to Rice University. In September 1963, the facility opened as the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). 
 
The Center became the focal point of NASA’s manned spaceflight program, developing spacecraft for Projects Gemini and Apollo, selecting and training astronauts, and operating the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. Beginning with Gemini 4 in June 1965, MSC’s Mission Control Center also took over flight control duties from the Mercury Control Center at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. As a result, the facility managed all subsequent manned space missions, including those related to Projects Gemini and Apollo, the Apollo Applications Program, the Space Shuttle Orbiters, and the International Space Station.
 
In 1973, the MSC was renamed in honor of the late President and Texas native Lyndon B. Johnson. (As Senate Majority Leader, Johnson sponsored the 1958 legislation that established NASA.) The Center continues to lead NASA’s efforts in space exploration, training both American and international astronauts, managing missions to and from the International Space Station, and operating scientific and medical research programs.
TFC
1960s
1960’s
industrial film
government film
Houston
Clear Lake
Harris County
NASA
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
space
outer space
space travel
spaceflight
space flight
flight
test flight
space program
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mission
astronaut
aerospace
science
scientist
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craft
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Donn Eisele
Eisele, Donn
Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin
Aldrin, Edwin “Buzz”
Buzz Aldrin
Aldrin, Buzz
John Young
Young, John
Thomas Stafford
Stafford, Thomas
Tom Stafford
Stafford, Tom
Eugene Cernan
Cernan, Euguene
Gene Cernan
Cernan, Gene
Virgil Grissom
Grissom, Virgil
Virgil “Gus” Grissom
Grissom, Virgil “Gus”
Gus Grissom
Grissom, Gus
Walter Schirra
Schirra, Walter
Wally Schirra
Schirra, Wally
Walter Cunningham
Cunningham, Walter
Walt Cunningham
Cunningham, Walt
North American Aviation
Block 1 Spacecraft
Block 2 Spacecraft
Goddard Space Flight Center
GSFC
Maryland
Kennedy Space Center
John F. Kennedy Space Center
KSC
Florida
Lunar Receiving Laboratory
Manned Spacecraft Center
MSC
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Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center
JSC
Real Time Computer Complex
Agena Target Vehicle
target vehicle
Gemini program
Project Gemini
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Gemini 3
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7094 Computer
computer
computer system
simulator
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test
testing
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Apollo Procedures Development Simulator
Apollo Simulator
Command Module Simulator
Communications, command, and telemetry system
CCATS
Dynamic Crew Procedure Simulator
IBM 360 Model 75J
Lunar Module Simulator
Pogo partial gravity simulator
Target and docking simulator
Univac 494 computers
Water Immersion Simulator
press conference
crew
backup crew
laboratory
lab
facility
quarantine
A-V Corporation
center
field center
space center