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Japan Screen Topics, 81-6: Japan’s Food Supply, Marine “Mechanimals,” Rabbit Island, Tokyo’s Gala Festival (1981)

Texas State Museum of Asian Cultures

Sound | 1981

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  •  Japan’s Food Supply 
  •  Marine “Mechanimals” 
  •  Rabbit Island 
  •  Tokyo’s Gala Festival 
 
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This episode of Japan Screen Topics has segments on the food supply in Japan, aquatic robots, Rabbit Island, and a festival in Tokyo. “Japan’s Food Supply” highlights some of the ways food makes its way to the Japanese consumer. It shows markets, farms, shipping, and agricultural scientists. “Marine ‘Mechanicals’” is about aquatic robots and the marine life forms that inspired the robot designers. “Rabbit Island” records the feral rabbits of Okunoshima and the people who feed and care for them. “Tokyo’s Gala Festival” shows a parade and celebration. Japan Screen Topics was a monthly publicity series produced by the International Motion Picture Company for the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs from 1961 to 1988. Now known as Japan Video Topics, the program continues to this day, distributed via Japanese embassies and consulates to organizations in over 100 countries.