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In A Strange Land (1955)

The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health

Sound | 1955

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TAMI Tags
  •  The director of a mental health hospital discusses the accomplishments and limitations of the Texas hospital system 
  •  New construction relieves overcrowding 
  •  Mental health hospitals still suffer from a lack of research funding and a shortage of properly trained doctors and technicians 
  •  The benefits of certain treatments, from shock therapy to drug regimes 
  •  Dr. Simon O. Johnson works with a patient of the Lincoln State Hospital in West Virginia 
  •  The therapeutic benefits of recreation activities and human contact 
  •  Homecoming day 
 
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This educational film from 1955 looks at the current status of Texas’s state hospital system. Produced by the University of Texas’s Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, the film considers the improvements made in mental health treatment across the state, from the construction of new facilities to the benefits of certain therapies. It also goes over the challenges still faced by the industry, including a lack of research funding and a shortage of space and properly trained mental health professionals.