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American Rice: Food for the World (1976)

Brazoria County Historical Museum

Sound | 1976

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  •  Introduction 
  •  A brief history of rice 
  •  “The rice crop begins with the breaking of the soil” 
  •  Leveling and smoothing of the fields is done with a land plane 
  •  Planting begins 
  •  Plenty of water is needed to properly grow rice 
  •   
  •  Combines harvest the rice at just the right time and level of moisture in the grain 
  •  After harvesting, rice is transferred from the combine to the auger wagon 
  •  Trucks drop off the harvested rice at the dryers 
  •  Rice is sampled for quality 
  •  The unique bid system used for determining the value of a rice crop is explained 
  •  Many different varieties of rice exist and more are developed in the United States 
  •  The rice milling process is explained 
  •  The rice is checked, sorted, and packaged 
  •  Interesting facts about rice exportation 
 
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This industrial film gives an overview of the American rice industry, an industry that maintains a strong presence on the Texas Gulf Coast. Beginning with a short history of rice’s journey to America, the film then explains the processes of planting, harvesting, and milling. The producer of this film, Jim W. Keeland, was a photographer and videographer in the Houston area for sixty years. He took photographs and films for Houston's NBC affiliate, KPRC-TV, from 1948 until 1961, worked for the Houston Post from 1951 to 1982 as a printer, and was a freelance photographer of agricultural subjects.