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Eugene Locke Campaign Advertisement (1968)

Daniel Redd

Sound | 1968

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  •  We have a different kind of unemployment problem in Texas 
  •  Eugene Locke should be Governor of Texas 
 
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This 1968 campaign advertisement for Eugene Locke explains how the candidate will address Texas’ unemployment problem if elected governor. Locke was a Dallas attorney and United States ambassador. Under President Lyndon B. Johnson, he served as both Ambassador to Pakistan and Deputy Ambassador to South Vietnam. Locke was also heavily involved in Texas politics, serving as Governor John Connally’s campaign manager for his first race in 1962 and president of the Democratic Party in Texas during Connally’s governorship. In 1968, Locke entered the Texas gubernatorial race himself. He was one of seven candidates vying for the Democratic nomination. Locke lost the primary to Preston Smith, who ultimately won the race. Bert Rodriguez’s Dallas-based production company, Visual Presentations, produced the advertisement. Rodriguez was also the producer of the Clio-Award-winning Old Home Bread commercials that introduced the world to C. W. McCall.