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The E.B. Hopkins Collection, no. 1 - Florida Vacation (c. 1925)

Hamon Arts Library - SMU

Silent | c. 1925

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TAMI Tags
  •  The construction of Miami’s Biltmore Hotel, a National Historic Landmark still operating today 
  •  Seminole alligator wrestling 
  •  Ships at port in Miami 
  •  Downtown Miami 
  •  Port of Miami 
 
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This home movie from Texas oilman E.B. Hopkins captures scenes of a family vacation to Miami, Florida in 1925. Among the picturesque scenes of the family at the beach, classic cars on the road, and ships at the Port of Miami, are images of the construction of the historic Biltmore Hotel that opened in 1926, now a National Historic Landmark. Also included are scenes of Seminole alligator wrestling, a tradition in the Everglades-region Native American tribe.
Petroleum geologist and oilman Edwin Butcher Hopkins was born to Andrew Delmar and Delia (Butcher) Hopkins in Evans, West Virgina on October 25, 1882. He attended the University of West Virginia, George Washington University, and Cornell University before beginning work in the geological department of the Mexican-Eagle Oil Company. He was married to Amy Myrtilla Longcope Hopkins of Lampasas, Texas in 1913 at a wedding in Dallas. After several years of work with Mexican-Eagle and rising to the rank of field superintendent in charge of production and exploration in Mexico, Hopkins moved to Washington D.C. in 1916 to begin consulting work as a geologist and petroleum engineer. Hopkins moved to Dallas in 1929 with his wife and young family to establish his home and permanent office, and he began work with the Peroleum Finance Corporation of Texas, the Drilling and Exploration Company, Inc., the Highland Oil Company, and the American Maracaibo Company. Hopkins also served as vice-president of the American Petroleum Geological Association and as a member of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. He was a trustee of the Dallas Art Museum, the Dallas Public Library, and the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Hopkins wrote many technical papers about his discoveries and work as a petroleum engineer and geologist, distinguishing himself within his field. He and his wife had five children. E.B. Hopkins died in Dallas on July 5, 1940.